"Eye scorching, ear splitting audiovisual mix-up inspired by the electronic music phenomena and today's epileptic media bombardment." -- Lucid House about his clip.

"Eye scorching, ear splitting audiovisual mix-up inspired by the electronic music phenomena and today's epileptic media bombardment." — Lucid House about his clip.

We live in a time of copy and paste, come and go, see and forget. The media have trained us to be always hungry for the new, the image in flux, the news that are in everybody’s mouth today and boringly old tomorrow. “Just in” or “breaking” are the helpless attempts to break through our worn out sense for sensation. Once the news broke it’s already not new anymore. And the world stops and stares to see if something interesting happens, until the next balloon boy flies along.

Original images are an endangered species today. Creativity and inspiration seem to have come to a halt. To sum it up, it has become really hard to find something that is more than just a pure copy of unattached events.

How do you make ‘new’ happen? Nothing is born out of a vacuum. I remember a pop group (ca. 1993) who forbade themselves to talk for three months in order to create a new sound for their upcoming album. That album was, well, so so. (It doesn’t make you wonder why I forgot their name. Do you remember them?)

Lucid House is Brighton, UK based Morris La Mantia. His approach is certainly not entirely new. He is taking something old and making something new out of it. Sure, it is copy and create, but I still think it’s better than a lot of stuff you find in posh art galleries.

Morris describes his work like this:

My works are an exploration into the key relationship between man and fire. How meditating on the flickering, glowing warmth could’ve triggered a creative, inventive awakening in early man.

For this clip he took images from movies starring Patricia Arquette, Pierce Brosnan, Maggie Cheung, Doris Day, Faye Dunaway, Cary Grant, Richard Harris, Ethan Hawke, Charlton Heston, Bruce Lee, Tony Leung, Sophia Loren, Marilyn Monroe, Elvis Presley, Omar Sharif, Uma Thurman and Joanne Whalley and mashed it all up in a colorful and lucid blend of eye candy. It is all like a dreamy trip.

The soundtrack is a hypnotizing blend of electronica, lingering between progressive house and layers of minimal, but it’s too shattered for the latter. (Lucid House also offers lucidloops, by the way.) The clip “June 2009” is mesmerizing. You should definitely check it out.